Ebenezer

Written By: Mary Jane Andrews


Here I raise my Ebenezer,
For my God has never failed.
Though I stumble, fall and falter,
And my fears have held me, jailed.

 
As sure as stars announce the morning,
And the seasons march in step,
He has never missed a sunset.
He has never winked or slept.

 
Though the stalking lion threatens,
Though the dark of doubt prevail,
And with fear my eyes are blinded,
By his acrid, fetid veil.

 
Here I raise my Ebenezer.
For my God has never failed.
By His hand, He lifts me to Him
Hands, my sin, had Him impaled.

 
Hands engraved before conception,
With the apple of His eye.
Unthinkable! He'd misplace me.
Ebenezer! Is my cry!



 
What is an Ebenezer?
Then Samuel took a stone and set it up between Mizpah and Jeshanah, and named it Ebenezer; for he said, "Thus far the LORD has helped us." So the Philistines were subdued and did not again enter the territory of Israel; the hand of the LORD was against the Philistines all the days of Samuel. The towns that the Philistines had taken from Israel were restored to Israel, from Ekron to Gath; and Israel recovered their territory from the hand of the Philistines. There was peace also between Israel and the Amorites. (1 Samuel 7:12-14 NRSV)
The word "Ebenezer" comes from Hebrew and is actually two words pronounced together: Even Haazer. Written in Hebrew it looks like this:
It is usually transliterated as a proper name by dropping the definite article (Ha) from the Hebrew word for "place" (Ezer) and putting it together with the Hebrew word for "stone" (Even) to create: "Ebenezer." The etymological roots of the word, thus defined, should demonstrate that an "Ebenezer" is, literally, a
"Stone of Help."
In 1 Samuel 4:1-11 and 5:1, the Ebenezer is strangely identified with a particular site, about four miles south of Gilgal, where the Israelites were twice defeated by the Philistines and the Ark of the Covenant was stolen. These battles took place, however, before the site was actually named Ebenezer. It was like someone saying that Dinosaurs once lived in Dallas county -- they did, but not when this area was called "Dallas." Likewise, the two battles mentioned in 1 Samuel 4 and 5 took place at Ebenezer, but some time before it was so-named.
The site wasn't named Ebenezer until after the Israelites finally defeated the Philistines, and took back the Ark of the Covenant. To commemorate the victorious battle, Samuel set up a marker-stone, named it "Stone of Help," and thereby the site became identified with the stone and with the place where God's miraculous help aided them in their victory over the Philistines. The stone, standing up-right, was called "Ebenezer," and the site naturally took on that name as well.
Literally speaking, an Ebenezer is a
"stone of help," or a reminder of God's Real, Holy Presence and Divine aid. Spiritually and theologically speaking, an Ebenezer can be nearly anything that reminds us of God's presence and help: the Bible, the Sacramental Elements, a cross, a picture, a fellow believer, a hymn – those things which serve as reminders of God's love, God's Real Presence, and God's assistance are "Ebenezers."

Submitted By: Ben Andrews